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  • Polymer and Materials Science  (112,478)
  • Engineering General  (9,884)
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  • 1
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: liquid crystal ; block copolymer ; polyester block ; polymethacrylate block ; magnetic field ; X-ray diffraction ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The phase and orientational behaviors of a series of liquid crystalline (LC) AB-type diblock copolymers comprising thermotropic main-chain (MC) polyester and side-group (SG) polymethacrylate blocks were investigated by X-ray diffraction. The MC and SG blocks were phase separated and gave rise to their individual mesophases that coexisted at equilibrium. The samples were oriented by using either a magnetic field or a mechanical field. In magnetically aligned samples both the MC and SG microphases were oriented with their smectic planes orthogonal to the magnetic field direction, independent of the copolymer composition. Mechanically aligned, fiber samples showed different orientations of the MC and SG smectic planes for different sample compositions. In this case the disposition of the smectic planes of the MC and SG blocks was driven by the relative length of the two blocks. Some features of the X-ray patterns of the copolymers were compared to those of the MC and SG homopolymers. In addition, the MC smectic domains crystallized on annealing without affecting the orientation that had been achieved by applying a magnetic field. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 21-29, 1998
    Additional Material: 11 Ill.
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 31-38 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: liquid crystals ; thermosets ; smectic epoxy ; nematic ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Deformation experiments were carried out for densely crosslinked smectic-like networks obtained from diepoxy monomers with twin mesogen architecture. For the initially unoriented smectic networks, the network could be aligned up to an orientation parameter of 0.35 by applying 8 MPa of external stress in the rubbery regime. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the deformed smectic network possesses both smectic-A like and smectic-C like structure. It is thought that after extension domains initially oriented parallel to the external stress displayed a smectic-A-like structure, whereas domains initially tilted with respect to the tensile direction showed a stress-induced smectic-C like structure. A smectic network oriented under a.c. electric fields with an orientation parameter of 0.4 had a smectic-A like structure and possessed linear elasticity in the rubbery regime. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 31-38, 1998
    Additional Material: 11 Ill.
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 39-48 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: poly-p-phenylenebenzobisoxazole ; X-ray scattering ; transmission electron microscopy ; Young's modulus ; tenacity ; crystal size ; orientation ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Morphological survey on new PBO fiber (Zylon®) was conducted by X-ray and transmission electron microscopic studies. Crystal size, orientation of the crystal, fibrils, microvoids, and fine structure were discussed. It was found that the molecule in the fiber showed high orientation (more than 0.99 in Hermann's orientation function for heat-treated fiber) and relatively small crystal sizes in the longitudinal (160 Å) and the transverse (110 Å) directions. Crystal modulus estimated by extrapolation to perfect orientation on the plot of the fiber modulus as a function of fiber orientation (Northolt's method) shows discrepancy from the crystal modulus directly obtained by X-ray scattering. This discrepancy means that the Northolt's model is insufficient to describe the Young's modulus of PBO fiber. Microvoids elongated to the fiber direction were examined by small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopic methods. The diameter of the microvoids was 20 Å to 30 Å and the fiber had a very thin microvoids-free layer (0.2 μm). Preferential orientation of the a-axis of crystal in the fiber was also confirmed. Summarizing these results, a structure model of the PBO fiber was proposed. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 39-48, 1998
    Additional Material: 16 Ill.
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  • 4
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    Electronic Resource
    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 991-997 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: poly(methyl methacrylate-co-lithium methacrylate)(P(MMA-co-LiMA)) ; ionomer ; polymer electrolyte ; ion content ; ion conductivities ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: We have prepared polymer electrolytes composed of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-lithium methacrylate) ionomer (P(MMA-co-LiMA)), low molecular weight PEG, and LiCF3SO3 salt. The ion groups in P(MMA-co-LiMA) could enhance the miscibility between the MMA units and PEG in the polymer electrolytes. This miscibility enhancement made the pathway of ion transport less tortuous, and consequently led to the increase in ion conductivity. The maximum ambient ion conductivities in these systems were measured to be in the range of 10-4-10-5 S/cm. The polymer electrolytes became transparent at the higher ion content owing to the enhanced miscibility. The mechanical stability of the polymer electrolytes was also improved through the introduction of ion groups into the PMMA. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 991-997, 1998
    Additional Material: 6 Ill.
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  • 5
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1025-1035 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polymer thin films ; thermosets ; microelectronics ; moisture ; physical aging ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: In polymers for microelectronics applications, moisture is known to have a deleterious effect upon device reliability. In this paper, the moisture transport behaviors of a newly developed family of all-aromatic and aromatic/aliphatic copolyester thermosetting films were described. The moisture uptake as a function of temperature, relative humidity, sample thickness, and processing conditions were presented via conjugate moisture sorption tests.1 It was found that the post curing near but below Tg resulted in an increase in both total moisture uptake and diffusion coefficient due to the effect of physical aging and the generation of sample defect volume. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1025-1035, 1998
    Additional Material: 18 Ill.
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1013-1024 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: nonlinear optical polymer ; pressure ; chromophore reorientation ; poly(alkyl methacrylates) ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Activation volumes for chromophore reorientation were measured for a series of guest-host polymeric materials, indicating a significant coupling between chromophore motion and the glassy α and β relaxation dynamics of the polymer host. The specific systems studied were formed by individually dissolving N,N-dimethyl-p-nitroaniline (DpNA), 4-(dimethylamino)-4′-nitrotolane (DMANT), 4-(diethylamino)-4′-nitrotolane (DEANT), and 1-((4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)ethynyl)-4-((4-nitrophenyl)ethynyl)benzene (DMAPEANT) in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA), and poly(isobutyl methacrylate) (PiBMA). In each of these systems, the isothermal, sub-Tg decay of the second-order optical susceptibility χ(2) was monitored as a function of pressure using second harmonic generation. In each system, the observed decay of χ(2) was represented by a stretched exponential equation from which the decay time τ0 and decay distribution width βKWW were determined. For each dopant molecule, the decrease in activation volume with the increasing size of the polymer host's alkyl side group and the pressure dependence of βKWW were indicative of partial coupling between chromophore rotation and the glassy β relaxation dynamics of the polymer host. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1013-1024, 1998
    Additional Material: 10 Ill.
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  • 7
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1037-1050 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polymer glasses ; glass transition ; diluents ; antiplasticization ; mixtures ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: A mathematical model to describe the specific volume of glassy mixtures of a polymer and a low molecular weight diluent or additive is presented. The model is based on understandable physical assumptions and relies on parameters that can be determined experimentally or estimated from methods available in the literature. The predictions of the model show good agreement with the experimental data for mixtures of four polymers with diluents that in the pure state are liquid, glassy, or crystalline. The observed negative departure from volume additivity, as defined by simple additivity of the specific volume of the pure glassy polymer and the pure amorphous diluent, is the result of the relaxation of the excess volume of the glassy mixture relative to the equilibrium state caused by mixing two components with different glass transition temperatures. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1037-1050, 1998
    Additional Material: 7 Ill.
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  • 8
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1051-1060 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polymer mixtures ; film casting ; solvent selectivity ; incompatibility ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Blends of polystyrene/poly(oxyethylene) (PS/POE) and polystyrene/poly-(methyl methacrylate) (PS/PMMA) have been obtained by casting from solution. Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Optical Microscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy showed that two incompatible polymers can present relatively good miscibility (formation of domains smaller than 5 μm) when the solvent from which the films are obtained does not present any noticeable selectivity towards the two polymers of the blends. An increase of the casting temperature increases the miscibility of PS and PMMA because the selectivity of the solvent used, towards these polymers decreases with increasing temperature. On the contrary, an increase of the casting temperature in the case of the PS and POE mixture decreases their miscibility because the selectivity of the solvent used increases with increasing temperature. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1051-1060, 1998
    Additional Material: 9 Ill.
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  • 9
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1061-1080 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polymer blends ; dilatometry ; free volume ; specific volume ; excess volume ; compressibility ; thermal expansivity ; equation of state ; scaling parameters ; crystallinity ; glass transition ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Melt-miscible polymer blends of poly(ethylene oxide)/atactic poly(methyl methacrylate (PEO/a-PMMA)) were prepared by melt-mixing and characterized by pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) dilatometry in the pressure and temperature range of 0 to 200 MPa and 20 to 200°C, respectively. The PVT data were analyzed in terms of two equations of state (EOS). The empirical Tait EOS was applied in the glassy, semicrystalline, and equilibrium melt state, and the Simha-Somcynsky EOS theory was applied in the equilibrium melt and glassy state. The Simha-Somcynsky EOS theory contains a free volume function. The temperature, pressure, and composition dependence of the free volume fraction h calculated from the Simha-Somcynsky EOS theory was studied. As a function of blend composition we observe that the free volume fraction, thermal expansivity, and compressibility all deviate mainly positively from linearity while the specific volume deviates mainly negatively from linearity. These findings are reconciled with composition-dependent free volume parameters, the free volume and cell volume as well as with self- and cross-interaction parameters derived from the Simha-Somcynsky EOS theory as applied to polymer mixtures. Moreover, the pressure dependence of glass and melting transitions as well as crystallization kinetics have been investigated. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1061-1080, 1998
    Additional Material: 18 Ill.
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  • 10
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 673-679 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: scanning force microscopy ; hectorite ; polystyrene ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Many important layered silicate-polymer nanocomposite materials may be synthesized using an in-situ polymerization process. Using this technique, organic monomers are intercalated into the interlayer regions of the hosts, where subsequent polymerization may then occur. In this paper, we report on the in-situ polymerization of styrene in Cu(II)-exchanged hectorite thin films. Scanning force microscopy (SFM) images of the polymer surface reveal that the surface polystyrene is generally aggregated into groups of elongated strands. SFM imaging of the interclay regions, in conjunction with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron spin resonance (ESR) data, indicates that approximately 20-30% of these regions contain polystyrene, with minimal reduction in the majority of Cu2+ sites observed. XRD data shows little or no intercalation of the monomer into the true intergallery regions. Instead, the polymer likely forms in intercrystallite or planar defect regions. In addition, two distinct phases of polymeric material are found within these defect regions, a highly polymerized polystyrene in addition to a polystyrene form exhibiting greater material stiffness. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 673-679, 1998
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  • 11
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 693-703 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: phase separation ; NMR spectroscopy ; block copolymers ; reaction injection molding ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The microphase separation (MPS) in polyureas based on methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) hard segment, diethyltoluenediamine chain extender, and amino-terminated polypropylene glycol soft segment prepared by reaction injection molding (RIM) was studied by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Incomplete microphase separation leads to the presence of mobilized hard segments dispersed in the soft segment domains as well as immobilized soft segments residing in the hard domains. This is detected by 1H-NMR spectra recorded under spinning at the magic angle (MAS) as well as two-dimensional wide-line separation (WISE) NMR spectra. The sizes of the various domains as well as the interfaces between them are quantified by spin diffusion measurements. In this way the impact of annealing, method of polymerization, and hard segment content on MPS is studied. Whereas annealing at temperatures up to 170°C results in improving the MPS, major changes are observed after annealing at higher temperatures (190°C), where the system changes from “soft-in-hard” to “hard-in-soft” behavior. The MPS decreases with increasing hard segment content. The highest MPS is observed for solution polymerized samples. The various NMR experiments clearly reveal the nonequilibrium nature of RIM systems. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 693-703, 1998
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  • 12
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 681-692 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: high-density polyethylene ; nonisothermal crystallization kinetics ; plateau temperature ; regime transition ; crystallinity ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The quiescent nonisothermal bulk crystallization kinetics of two high-density polyethylene resins were investigated by a modified light-depolarizing microscopy (LDM) technique. The technique allows studies at average cooling rates up to 2500°C/min. The polymer was found to crystallize at a pseudo-isothermal temperature even at these very high cooling rates. The overall bulk crystallization rate increased rapidly as the cooling rate and supercooling increased. Crystallization kinetics was analyzed by Avrami analysis. Avrami exponents near 3 suggested spherical growth geometry and instantaneous nucleation at predetermined sites. Observation of spherulites by optical microscopy together with a number density of spherulites that changed little with increase in cooling rate or supercooling supported this model of crystallization behavior. Analysis of the half-time of crystallization based on the Lauritzen and Hoffman secondary nucleation theory indicated that the regime II-III transition was found to occur at a degree of supercooling of approximately 22°C. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 681-692, 1998
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  • 13
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1107-1114 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polyelectrolytes ; conformational change ; water-acetone mixture ; viscosity and conductivity ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Samples of a polyelectrolyte poly(methacryloylethyl trimethylammonium methylsulfate), PMETMMS, with molar masses Mw = 22-25 × 106 were examined with viscosity, static light scattering, and conductivity measurements in a water-acetone solvent. Because acetone is a nonsolvent for this polymer the measurements were performed to determine the influence of the solvent composition, the polymer concentration, and the presence of added ions on the conformation of the polyelectrolyte in mixed solvents. The possible influence of a hydrodynamic field on the polymer conformation was also studied. The viscosity of the polymer solutions as a function of polymer concentration, as well as of the solvent composition, was studied using a broad range of shear rates. When the mass fraction of acetone in the solvent, γ, is below 0.5, the solutions show a usual polyelectrolyte behavior. When γ ≥ 0.80, the polymer adopts a compact conformation. This is observed as a decrease of the radius of gyration, Rg, second virial coefficient, A2, the viscosity, and also as a change in the conductivity of the solution. The change in the polymer conformation may be induced also by dilution. When 0.60 ≤ γ 〈 0.80, a gradual decrease in the polymer concentration leads to a sudden decrease of the reduced viscosity, which indicates a decrease in the particle size. The values of Mw measured by static light scattering were constant in all experiments. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1107-1114, 1998
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  • 14
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 395-402 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: syndiotactic polypropylene ; form-IV ; form II ; kink bands ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The packing of the chains in (T6G2T2G2)n conformation of the form IV of s-PP is revisited on the basis of packing energy and structure factor calculations. According to this analysis, an alternative mode of packing has been suggested. A monoclinic structural model, with the unit cell centered on the C face, is obtained, after small changes of the atomic coordinates in the triclinic structural model as proposed by Chatani et al. The monoclinic model presents a lower packing energy than the triclinic model and a good agreement between the calculated and observed structure factors. The triclinic structural model implies that all the chains are rotated by the same amount around the chain axis with respect to the monoclinic structural model. Since clockwise and counter clockwise rotations are equivalent, the monoclinic structural model may be taken as descriptive of the order in the long range, for the form IV of s-PP, or in other terms, descriptive of an average structure (space group C2, unit cell constants equal to am = 14.17 Å, bm = 5.72 Å, cm = 11.6 Å, and βm = 108.8°). The triclinic structural model for this polymorph, instead (space group P1, unit cell constants equal to at = 5.72 Å, bt = 7.64 Å, ct = 11.60 Å, αt = 73.1°, βt = 88.8°, γt = 112.0°) is probably more properly descriptive of local situation of order (the symmetry, locally, is broken). Analogies between the monoclinic limit ordered structural model for the form IV and the orthorhombic limit ordered structural model for the form II (with chains in the more stable (TTGG)n conformation) of s-PP are also provided. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 395-402, 1998
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  • 15
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1153-1165 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: even-odd nylons ; lamellar crystals ; structure ; hydrogen-bonding schemes ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Nylon 6 9 has been shown to have structures with interchain hydrogen bonds in both two and in three directions. Chain-folded lamellar crystals were studied using transmission electron microscopy and sedimented crystal mats and uniaxially oriented fibers studied by X-ray diffraction. The principal room-temperature structure shows the two characteristic (interchain) diffraction signals at spacings of 0.43 and 0.38 nm, typical of α-phase nylons; however, nylon 6 9 is unable to form the α-phase hydrogen-bonded sheets without serious distortion of the all-trans polymeric backbone. Our structure has c and c* noncoincident and two directions of hydrogen bonding. Optimum hydrogen bonding can only occur if consecutive pairs of amide units alternate between two crystallographic planes. The salient features of our model offer a possible universal solution for the crystalline state of all odd-even nylons. The nylon 6 9 room-temperature structure has a C-centered monoclinic unit cell (β = 108°) with the hydrogen bonds along the C-face diagonals; this structure bears a similarity to that recently proposed for nylons 6 5 and X3. On heating nylon 6 9 lamellar crystals and fibers, the two characteristic diffraction signals converge and meet at 0.42 nm at the Brill temperature, TB · TB for nylon 6 9 lamellar crystals is slightly below the melting point (Tm), whereas TB for nylon 6 9 fibers is ≅ 100°C below Tm. Above TB, nylon 6 9 has a hexagonal unit cell; the alkane segments exist in a mobile phase and equivalent hydrogen bonds populate the three principal (hexagonal) directions. A structure with perturbed hexagonal symmetry, which bears a resemblance to the reported γ-phase for nylons, can be obtained by quenching from the crystalline growth phase (above TB) to room temperature. We propose that this structure is a “quenched-in” perturbed form of the nylon 6 9 high-temperature hexagonal phase and has interchain hydrogen bonds in all three principal crystallographic directions. In this respect it differs importantly from the γ-phase models. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1153-1165, 1998
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  • 16
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1167-1189 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: poly(dimethylsiloxane) ; silica ; hydrolysis ; condensation ; gelation ; composites ; filled elastomers ; stress-strain isotherms ; reinforcement ; X-ray scattering ; neutron scattering ; fractal geometry ; disordered systems ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Various synthetic protocols were used to prepare several classes of polysiloxane-silica filler systems. The structures of these fillers and their interactions with the polysiloxane matrices were studied using small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering. In addition, the mechanical properties of the composites were characterized using equilibrium stress-strain isotherms in elongation. The results indicated that manipulation of the chemical reactions used to generate the filler can lead to a wide range of complex structures and unusual properties. Some of the observed mechanical properties were correlated with information on the composite structures and on elastomer-filler interactions. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1167-1189, 1998
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  • 17
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1201-1209 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polymer electrolytes ; NMR ; conductivity ; glasses ; Arrhenius and VTF dependences ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: We have studied the temperature variation of conductivity and 1H NMR linewidth of (PEG)xNH4ClO4 (x = 20, 30, 46, 100, 200, & 1000) polymer electrolyte systems. The temperature dependence of the conductivity shows two distinct behaviors, the low temperature VTF dependence crossing over to Arrhenius dependence at higher temperatures. The departure from the VTF behavior is found to be composition dependent. NMR spectra indicate the presence of large fractions of crystalline regions that start to melt around the crossover temperature. We understand the deviation from the VTF behavior as a consequence of this crystalline to elastomer transition. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1201-1209, 1998
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  • 18
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 447-453 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polyethylene terephthalate ; low density polyethylene ; isocyanate functional group ; compatibility ; crystallization ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: To evaluate the compatibilizing effects of isocyanate (NCO) functional group on the polyethylene terephthalate/low density polyethylene (PET/LDPE) blends, LDPE grafted with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-isophorone diisocyanate (LDPE-g-HI) was prepared and blended with PET. The chemical reaction occurred during the melt blending in the PET/LDPE-g-HI blends was confirmed by the result of IR spectra. In the light of the blend morphology, the dispersions of the PET/LDPE-g-HI blends were very fine over the PET/LDPE blends. DSC thermograms indicated that PET microdispersions produced by the slow cooling of the PET/LDPE-g-HI blends were largely amorphous, with low crystallinity, due to the chemical bonding. The tensile strengths of the PET/LDPE-g-HI blends were higher than those of the PET/LDPE blends having a poor adhesion. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 447-453, 1998
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  • 19
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    Bognor Regis [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 455-462 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: photoreactive polymer blends ; photocrosslinking kinetics ; photodimerization of anthracene ; Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts relaxation ; poly(vinyl methyl ether) ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Mixtures of polystyrene derivatives (PSCS) and poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) were made photocrosslinkable by chemically labeling PSCS chains with photoreactive anthracene. Miscibility of these anthracene-labeled PSCS/PVME blends was examined by light scattering under several crosslinking conditions in the one-phase region via photodimerization of anthracenes. As the reaction proceeds, the coexistence curve of PSCS/PVME blends shifts toward the low temperature side. By following the changes in concentration of anthracenes with irradiation time, it was found that the crosslinking reaction of PSCS chains in the blends does not follow the mean-field kinetics. However, it can be well expressed by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) relaxation mechanism, indicating that the crosslinking reaction proceeds inhomogeneously in the blends. By scaling the reaction time with the average reaction rate obtained from the KWW equation modified for the reaction kinetics, all the crosslinking data obtained in the miscible region of the reacted blends fall on a single master curve. These experimental results suggest the universal behavior of the photocrosslinking kinetics obtained under the “shallow quench” conditions in the region far away from the coexistence curve of the reacting blends. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 455-462, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1219-1225 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: poly(ethylene terephthalate) ; oligomer ; poly(ethylene glycol) ; epoxy resin ; concentrated solution ; crystallinity ; thermoreversible gel ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was rapidly crystallized through thermoreversible gelation in a liquid ethylene glycol oligomer or in epoxy resin. The solutions formed gel rapidly on cooling. Polarized light microscopy and small-angle light scattering showed that these gels contain large, regular PET spherulites. The gels may be formed by two consecutive processes: the phase separation and crystallization, and gelation by formation of a three-dimensional PET network in the oligomer solvents, where the nodes of the network are PET spherulites. The crystallinity of PET recovered from polymer/oligomer gels is near 72% measured by wide-angle X-ray diffraction method, which is about 20% higher than PET samples crystallized by solution crystallization in small molecule solvent, high temperature annealing, and stretching techniques. It takes only a few minutes to form the highly crystalline phase PET in the PET/oligomer system, and the crystallinity of the dried gel is independent of the concentration of the original solution. Excimer-fluoresence and Raman spectroscopic studies indicated that PET recovered from the gels are in an ordered state with few chain entanglements. The entanglement density of the recovered PET recovered from a 20 wt % solution in ethylene glycol oligomer is as low as that of freeze-extracted PET from a 0.5 wt % solution in phenol. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1219-1225, 1998
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  • 21
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1227-1233 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: FTIR spectroscopy ; isotactic polystyrene ; crystallization process ; induction period ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The melt crystallization process of isotactic polystyrene (i-PS) was studied by means of in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, with a focus on the conformational changes during the induction period. The spectra obtained during the induction period suggested the occurrence of some ordered structure that is characterized by higher regularity and packing of the helical moieties than observed in the melt. This ordered structure was clearly different from the amorphous structure, and close to the crystal structure. The Avrami analysis indicated that the formation process of the ordered structure at the late stage of the induction period is similar to the growth process of the crystallites after the induction period. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1227-1233, 1998
    Additional Material: 10 Ill.
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  • 22
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 827-840 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polyimides ; imidization ; perylenetetracarboxydiimide ; electron transfer ; fluorescence quenching ; polyimide blends ; miscibility ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Perylenetetracarboxydiimide (PEDI) molecularly dispersed in polyamic acid (PAA) and polyimide (PI) films has unique fluorescence properties. An originally strong fluorescence of PEDI is efficiently quenched in the PAA films. The systematic variation of the chain structure of the PAA matrices revealed that the aromatic amide groups in the PAA chains function as a quencher. When a PAA derived from 3,4,3′4′-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (BPDA) and p-phenylenediamine (PDA), BPDA/PDA, was used as a matrix polymer, the fluorescence of the dye dispersed in the film increased abruptly as imidization of the matrix proceeds. But annealing at temperatures higher than 320°C in the step-heating process caused a gradual decrease in the fluorescence intensity. The decreased intensity results from the dye-PDA units interactions intensified by the denser molecular packing of the matrix polymer chains. PEDI shows significant dependence of the fluorescence intensity on the chain structure of the PI matrices. In the various PI films containing a fixed diamine component, the dye fluorescence intensity reduces linearly with an increase in the intramolecular charge transfer ability of the PI matrices. From the result, we propose a fluorescence quenching mechanism through multistep electron transfer processes. The BPDA/PDA polyimide matrix leads to a strong PEDI fluorescence whereas the pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA)-based PI matrices do not. For the blends composed of these PIs, the fluorescence of PEDI bound into the main chains provides a valuable indicator of the miscibility on the molecular level. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 827-840, 1998
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  • 23
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 851-859 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: poly(aryl ether ketone)s ; dielectric relaxation spectroscopy ; dynamic mechanical analysis ; α-relaxation ; β-relaxation ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The relaxation behavior of four amorphous poly(aryl ether ketone)s was investigated using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis. The temperature dependence of the relaxation times of the glass transition process and the cooperative nature of this process were unaffected by changes in polymer structure. The temperature location of the loss peaks for all polymers progressed smoothly between the low frequency of the mechanical measurements and the higher frequencies of the dielectric probe. Differences were observed in mechanical activation energy and dielectric relaxation strength for one polymer which contained a significant concentration of meta linkages, compared with the para-linked polymers, while relaxation broadness was generally greater in the dynamic mechanical mode. Changes in chemical structure had little effect on the shape, intensity, and location of the β-relaxation peak, the main observation being that the Arrhenius activation energy measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was significantly higher than that calculated from the dielectric data. The dielectric β-relaxation was sensitive to absorbed moisture. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 851-859, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1275-1281 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: chitosan ; polyethylene glycol polyblend ; intermolecular interaction ; viscometry ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The molecular structures of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and chitosan (CS) are illustrated as follows: 1CS2PEG\documentclass{article}\pagestyle{empty}\begin{document}$$ {\rm HO} \hbox{--} {\rm CH}_2 {\rm CH}_2 \rlap{--} ({\rm O} \hbox{--} {\rm CH}_2 {\rm CH}_2 \rlap{--} {\rm O} \hbox{--} {\rm CH}_2 {\rm CH}_2 \hbox{--} {\rm OH} $$\end{document} The intermolecular interactions between these two polymers were studied by viscometry with a thermodynamic parameter α, which was first proposed by Sun et al. The weight additive rule of the intrinsic viscosity of polyblend relating to the values of each polymeric constituent was attested to with PEG/CS polyblend. The calculation formula of Huggins coefficient for polyblend, km, was theoretically deduced, and a very simple expression of α was obtained. First, the values of α for PEG/CS blends with different PEG molecular weight were estimated from the experimental viscosity data of the polyblends with different mixed ratio. According to these values of α, it can be predicted that an attractive interaction exists between the molecule of PEG and that of CS. Second, the viscosity of CS was measured in pseudo-solvents (PEG dissolved in 0.01N sodium chloride aqueous solution) with different PEG concentrations. From these viscosity data, the values of cross Huggins coefficient are calculated to be all larger than the values of the Huggins coefficient both for CS and for PEG. On the revised α criterion, the dissimilar molecular interaction in PEG/CS polyblend is demonstrated to be attractive too. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1275-1281, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 537-542 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: sulfonated polyelectrolytes ; gelatin ; complex stoichiometry ; size-exclusion chromatography ; flow field-flow fractionation ; hydrodynamic size ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: No abstract.
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  • 26
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 543-553 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polyacrylonitrile ; polyimine ; isotacticity ; dynamic mechanical analysis ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) films have been “grafted” onto copper electrodes by cathodic polarization and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The dynamic mechanical response shows two or three transitions depending on the film thickness and the potential deposition. The viscoelastic properties of “ungrafted” PAN films, e.g., solvent cast films of commercially available PAN, are deeply different from those of “electrografted” films. The experimental data support that “ungrafted” chains are paracrystalline in contrast to the “grafted” ones which are essentially amorphous. Moreover, the irreversible transformation of the “grafted” PAN chains observed beyond 225°C is confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis and ascribed to an intramolecular cyclization of PAN into polyimine. This reaction occurs rapidly and at a comparatively low temperature with respect to “ungrafted” PAN, which suggests that the “grafted” chain configuration might be predominantly isotactic. The isotacticity and the amorphous structure appear to decrease as the thickness of the PAN film is increased. Literature data and the herein reported observations would suggest a dependence of the amorphous structure of PAN on the chain isotacticity. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 543-553, 1998
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  • 27
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 555-565 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polyester ; annealing ; birefringence ; mechanical loss factor ; orientation ; density ; crystalline ; profile ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Polyester (Egyptian) fibers were annealed at constant temperature (190°C) with different annealing times. Density, crystallinity, mean square density fluctuation, mechanical loss factor, and molecular orientation were calculated. Densities and mechanical loss factor were determined using an acoustic method. Changes in the molecular orientation were evaluated from the resulting optical data using the polarizing Pluta interference microscope. Correlation of data obtained by one method with another leads to relational changes in optothermal properties and in the molecular orientation. Changes of refractive index profiles of annealed PET fibers are provided. Illustrations using graphs and microinterferograms are shown. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 555-565, 1998
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  • 28
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 567-572 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: surface ; interfaces ; diffusion ; polystyrene ; polyphenylene oxide ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Symmetric polydisperse (Mw = 23 × 104, Mw/Mn = 2.84) and monodisperse (Mw = 21 × 104, Mw/Mn 〈 1.05) polystyrene (PS), and asymmetric polydisperse PS/poly(2,6-dimethyl 1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) interfaces have been bonded in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PS. In a lap-shear joint geometry, strength develops in all cases with time to the fourth power, which indicates that it is diffusion controlled. Strength developing at short times at the polydisperse PS/PS interface, at 90°C, is higher than that at the monodisperse interface, at 92°C (at Tg - 13°C in both cases), presumably due to the contribution of the low molecular weight species. The decrease of strength at the PS/PPO interface when the bonding temperature decreases from 113 to 70°C, i.e., from Tg + 10°C to Tg - 33°C of the bulk PS, indicates a high molecular mobility at the surface as compared to that in the bulk, and can be expressed by a classical diffusion equation, which is valid above Tg (of the surface layer). © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 567-572, 1998
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  • 29
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 573-581 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polyether polyol ; polyurethane foam ; block-segmented copolymers ; microphase separation ; optical microscopy ; transmission electron microscopy ; small-angle X-ray scattering ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: A series of flexible polyurethane slabstock foam samples were prepared with varying water content and studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), video-enhanced optical microscopy (VEM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). A new TEM sample preparation technique was developed in which the foam is impregnated with water, frozen, and microtomed, and the polyether soft segment is selectively degraded in the electron beam. Structures of two size scales were detected. A texture with grains (“urea aggregates”) 50-200 nm in size was imaged using both VEM and low-magnification TEM for foams with formulations containing more than 2 pphp water. For the first time, images of urea hard segment microdomains in polyurethane foam (approximately 5 nm in size) were obtained using high-magnification TEM. A microdomain spacing of approximately 6-8 nm was estimated from the SAXS scattering profiles. Glycerol was added to one of the formulations in order to modify the urea microphase separation and to give insight into morphology development in molded polyurethane foam systems. No structure was observed in low-magnification TEM images of the glycerol-modified foam, although smaller structures (hard segments) were detected at high magnification and by SAXS. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 573-581, 1998
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  • 30
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 583-593 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: enthalpy relaxation ; differential scanning calorimetry ; peak-shift method ; polymethyl(α-n-alkyl)acrylates ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: In this work, we have investigated by DSC the structural relaxation of amorphous polymethyl(α-n-alkyl)acrylates in which it is possible to change the length of the alkyl chain. We have evaluated the Narayanaswamy parameter, x, which controls the relative contribution of temperature and of structure to the relaxation time, the apparent activation energy, Δh*, and the nonexponentiality parameter, β, of the stretched exponential response function. The results suggest that x increases while Δh* decreases and β remains constant as the length of the side chain increases. This allows us to comment on the effect of chemical modification on the relaxation kinetics. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 583-593, 1998
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  • 31
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 595-606 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: IR ; perfluoro(sulfonate/carboxylate) bilayer ; sol-gel reactions ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: [Perfluoro-organic]/[silicon oxide] hybrids were formed by conducting sol-gel reactions of tetraethylorthosilicate within a perfluoro(carboxylate/sulfonate) bilayer membrane in the Co+2 form. FTIR and 29Si solid-state NMR spectroscopies were used to probe general aspects of molecular structure within the silicon oxide phase as a function of its relative content. The internal gel structure is considerably unconnected in terms of the population of Si—O—Si groups in cyclic vs. linear substructures and degree of Si atom coordination about bonded SiO4 units. In situ (HO)xSiO2[1-1/4x] intrastructure become increasingly less connected and more strained with regard to bonding geometry with increasing percent silicon oxide. Structural differences are seen between the silicon oxide component incorporated in carboxylate and sulfonate layers. These inorganically modified perfluorinated ionomers have potential as fast-proton conducting membranes for fuel cells and as permselective membranes in liquid pervaporation cells. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 595-606, 1998
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  • 32
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 607-615 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: ternary phase diagram ; binodal curve ; Flory-Huggins theory ; interaction parameter ; membrane formation ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: In this work, the ternary phase diagrams in three nonsolvent/solvent/PMMA systems (n-hexane/n-butyl acetate/PMMA, water/acetone/PMMA, and n-hexane/acetone/PMMA) were constructed by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement. Binodal curves were calculated by using the Flory-Huggins theory for three-component systems and measured by titrating the PMMA solution with nonsolvent until the onset of turbidity. By using concentration-dependent nonsolvent/solvent and solvent/PMMA interaction parameters and constant nonsolvent/PMMA interaction parameters, good agreement has been obtained between the calculation and the measurement. The values of nonsolvent/solvent interaction parameters were taken from the literature sources, and the values of solvent/PMMA and nonsolvent/PMMA interaction parameters were measured by vapor sorption and swelling equilibrium, respectively. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 607-615, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 617-627 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: isotactic polypropylene foams ; supercritical propane solutions ; high surface areas ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Crystallization of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) from homogeneous solution in supercritical propane yields open-cell foams of high surface area (120-150 m2/g). Their morphology usually consists of microspheres with a dense core and a porous periphery of radiating fibrils. Pore radii covering the mesopore range (2-50 nm), making their largest contribution at 10-20 nm, were calculated from nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Surface areas of the correct order of magnitude are obtained by assuming that gas adsorption takes place on the surfaces of lamellar crystals. Crystallization of iPP from n-butane and n-heptane generates foams of lower mesoporosity and smaller surface area. These more “liquid-like” solvents do not allow the formation of an open network of mesopores or they promote its collapse upon their removal. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 617-627, 1998
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  • 34
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 55-64 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: PDLC ; polarization ; angular discrimination ; copolymer ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Electrooptic responses (voltage and angular-dependent transmittance) of polymer/liquid crystal composite films with H, V, and unpolarized lights have been studied based on a nematic liquid crystal (Ro-5921) and four types of homopolymers and copolymers from ethyl methacrylate and styrene with different compositions. In this way, the index ratio of the polymer (np) to the ordinary refractive index of liquid crystal (no)(np/no) has been varied systematically, and the effect of the index ratio on viewing angle, applied voltage, response times, and transient response have been investigated. With increasing styrene content in the copolymer, droplet size increased, threshold (Vth) and saturation (Vsat) voltage, and rise time decreased. With np ≲ no, maximum transmittance occurred at normal incidence, regardless of the type of polarization. On the contrary with np 〉 no, V-polarization gave a peak in the transmittance-voltage curve, and transmittance overshot upon removal of the field, and these were interpreted in terms of effective refractive index and two-step relaxations. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 55-64, 1998
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  • 35
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1595-1608 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: PVC blends ; thermally stimulated current depolarization ; dynamic mechanical analysis ; physical quantities of relaxation transitions ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: A number of blends based on suspension poly(vinyl chloride) and stabilizers with poly(ethylene) chlorinated in a fluidized-bed reactor containing 21.8% chlorine, hydroxyl-terminated poly(butadiene), and ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer have been studied using such methods as thermally stimulated current depolarization and dynamic mechanical analysis. Some dielectric and thermodynamic parameters (τmax, τo, Ea, ΔH*, ΔSE*, ΔG*, μeff) have been determined. Blends containing randomly chlorinated poly(ethylene) exhibited dipole-dipole interactions between the macromolecules of poly(vinyl chloride) which decreased at the expense of the long sequences of nonchlorinated methylene groups. Simultaneously, an increased physical interaction between poly(vinyl chloride) and the additives was observed in blends containing chlorinated poly(ethylene) and/or hydroxyl-terminated poly(butadiene), and ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer. On the basis of the data of dynamic mechanical analysis obtained a heterogeneous structure of the blends is suggested. The development of a boundary interfacial layer with a proper region of relaxation proves the formation of compatible structures between the components. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1595-1608, 1998
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  • 36
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2327-2337 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: surface tension ; surface energy ; contact angle ; liquid crystalline polymers ; thermotropic polymers ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: We have determined the surface energies (γs) of two liquid crystalline polyesters (Vectra™ A-950 [Hoechst Celanese, NJ] and Xydar™ [Amoco, GA]) and one polyesteramide (Vectra™ B-950 [Hoechst Celanese, NJ]) using contact angle techniques at room temperature. These LCPs were dissolved in bis-trifluoromethyl phenol and spin coated upon glass slides to form thin films. The contact angle measurements were carried out employing a Ramé-Hart Contact Angle Goniometer (Ramé-Hart, NJ). Pure water, glycerol, formamide, and diiodomethane were chosen as the testing liquids. Various surface energy calculation models were utilized to analyze the surface energies of these LCP films. Experimental data suggest that surface energy values did match between two-liquid geometric and three-liquid acid-base approaches if the correct combinations of testing liquid were used. However, the three-liquid Lifshitz-van der Waals acid-base method is more suitable for the surface energy calculation of these three LCPs, and provides much more information (e.g., acidity and basity of LCP surfaces). The average surface energies of Vectra™ A-950, Vectra™ B-950, and Xydar™ are 41.0, 41.9, and 42.3 mJ/cm2, respectively. In addition, all these three LCPs should be classed as monopolar Lewis bases because their Lewis acid components, γ+, are negligible. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. 36: 2327-2337, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2311-2325 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: poly(ethylene oxide) ; crystallization ; AFM ; spherulites ; crystal growth ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to investigate morphological development during the crystallization of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) from the melt. PEOs with molecular weights of 1 × 105 and 7 × 106 were used. Height and amplitude images were recorded, using the tapping mode. For both polymers, the mode of spherulite development varied with the velocity of the growth front. For slow growth velocities, the growth of the crystallites was linear, with growth initially occurring by single lamellae, later developing into growth arms by screw dislocation spawning of crystallites. At intermediate growth velocities, stacks of lamellae develop rapidly. The splaying apart of adjacent crystals and growth arms is abundant. The operation of growth spirals was observed directly in this growth velocity range. The crystals formed by the giant screw dislocations diverge immediately from the original growth direction, providing a source of interlamellar splaying. At low and intermediate velocities, the front propagates by the advance of primary growth arms, with the regions between the arms filled in by arms growing behind the primary front. At the highest velocity observed here, the formation of lamellar bundles and immediate splaying results in recognizable spherulites developing at the earliest stages of crystallization. The change from linear growth to splaying and nonlinear growth are qualitatively explained in terms of driving force, elastic resistance and the presence of compositional and/or elastic fields in the melt. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. 36: 2311-2325, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2349-2354 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: polyethylene ; slow crack growth ; γ-irradiation ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The effect of γ-irradiation on slow crack growth (SCG) in a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) was measured and compared with behavior of high density polyethylene (HDPE) and a recrystallized HDPE (RCHDPE). The three materials exhibited the same dependence on dose up to 3 Mrd. The HDPE became brittle above 50 Mrd. The resistance to SCG of MDPE and RCHDPE increased very rapidly with dose above 3 Mrd, until at 50-80 Mrd their resistance to SCG became extraordinarily high. This high resistance to SCG was accompanied by a transition from crazing to shear deformation at the root of a notch. It was found that for the same concentration, crosslinks are more effective than short chain branches for increasing resistance to SCG. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. 36: 2349-2354, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2355-2369 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: fracture ; fatigue ; polyethylene ; molecular weight distribution ; short chain branch content ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Stepwise fatigue crack propagation in a range of polyethylene resins, some of which are candidates for use in pipes for natural gas distribution, was studied. Examination of the effect of molding conditions on fatigue crack propagation in a pipe resin indicated that fast cooling under pressure produced specimens with the same crack resistance as specimens taken from a pipe extruded from this resin. The mechanism of stepwise crack propagation in fatigue was the same as reported previously for creep loading. Observations of the region ahead of the arrested crack revealed a complex damage zone that consisted of a thick membrane at the crack tip followed by a main craze with subsidiary shear crazes that emerged from the crack tip at an angle to the main craze. The effects of molecular parameters, such as molecular weight, comonomer content, and branch distribution, on the kinetics of fatigue crack propagation were examined. Correlation of creep and fatigue crack resistance made it possible to relate fatigue fracture toughness to molecular parameters by invoking concepts of craze fibril stability developed for creep. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 2355-2369, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1657-1668 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: microstructure ; properties ; poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) ; living anionic polymerization ; hydrogenated derivatives ; triblock copolymer ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The relationship between the microstructure and the properties of poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene)s, obtained by living anionic polymerization with an alkyllithium/amine system, and their hydrogenated derivatives are reported. The 1,2-bond/1,4-bond molar ratio of poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) was determined by measuring 2D-NMR with the H—H COSY method. The glass transition temperature of poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) was found to rise with an increase in the ratio of 1,2-bonds to 1,4-bonds or with an increase of the number average molecular weight. The 1,2-bond of the polymer chain gives a high flexural strength and heat distortion temperature. Hydrogenated poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) has the highest Tg (231°C) among all hydrocarbon polymers ever reported. 1,3-Cyclohexadiene-butadiene-1,3-cyclohexadiene triblock copolymer and 1,3-cyclohexadiene-styrene-1,3-cyclohexadiene triblock copolymer have high heat resistance and high mechanical strength. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1657-1668, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1695-1702 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: sorption ; dilation ; diffusion ; conditioning effect ; glassy polymer ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Sorption, dilation, and diffusion behaviors were studied for the system of polysulfone/CO2 with regard to the effects of CO2 conditioning, i.e., exposure to high-pressure CO2. Concurrent measurements of solubility, dilation, and diffusivity were performed for polysulfone films before and after the conditioning at 25 and 50 atm. While the solubility and dilation were enhanced by the conditioning, the diffusivity appeared to be depressed. Results were analyzed on the basis of the dual-mode sorption model, with the assumption that the Henry's law dissolution was not affected by the conditioning. Consistent description was achieved then by attributing the changes to increased amount of Langmuir adsorption. The conditioning effect on the diffusivity, which had not been reported before based on CO2 sorption kinetics, suggests that the permeability of glassy polymers would not always be enhanced by the conditioning, but may also be decreased. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1695-1702, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2393-2399 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: PEEK ; nonisothermal ; growth rate ; crystallization ; kinetics ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: During cooling at a rate of 10°C/min from the melt state of PEEK we have followed the growth of spherulites using an optical microscope equipped with a camera. The isothermal growth rates of crystallization in the temperature range of 266-308°C could be estimated by means of a differential equation. These continuous growth rate data were used further for kinetic analysis, which indicated that PEEK exhibited an unmistakable regime II → III transition at 296°C. The results compared favorably with those obtained by the traditional isothermal method, which is time consuming. Due to chain folding, the Thomas-Staveley constant should be closer to 0.25 instead of 0.1 or 0.3. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. 36: 2393-2399, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2401-2412 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: nylon 2 4 ; chain folding ; lamellar crystals ; structure and morphology ; crystallization ; electron microscopy ; Brill transformation ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Chain-folded lamellar crystals of nylon 2 4 have been prepared from dilute solution by addition of poor solvent. Two crystal structures are observed at room temperature: a monoclinic form I, precipitated at elevated temperature, and a less-defined, orthorhombic form II, precipitated at room temperature. The unit cell parameters for both forms are similar to those reported for its isomer, nylon 3. Nylon 2 4 form II is a liquid-crystal-like or disordered phase, consisting of hydrogen-bonded sheets in poor register in the hydrogen bond direction. Form I crystals have two characteristic interchain spacings of 0.41 nm and 0.39 nm at room temperature and on heating, exhibit a structural transformation and a Brill temperature (250°C) characteristic of many other even-even nylons. Nylon 2 4 is a member of the nylon 2 Y and nylon 2N 2(N+1) families, and the form I crystals show behavior commensurate with both. We propose they contain a proportion of intersheet hydrogen bonds at room temperature, similar to that for the nylon 2 Y family, and the short dimethylene alkane segments mean that the structure consists of hydrogen-bonded a-sheets, with an amide unit in each fold, similar to that of nylon 4 6. The fold geometry and sheet structure is compared with chain-folded apβ-sheet polypeptides and nylon 3. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. 36: 2401-2412, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2423-2433 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: gelation theory ; nonlinear polymerization ; nonrandom crosslinking ; molecular weight distribution ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: On the basis of the first-order Markovian statistics, we propose a general matrix formula for the weight-average molecular weight of crosslinked polymer systems, explicitly given by M̄w = M̄w,0 + WX0 (I - X)-1 Sf. This equation is valid for both step and chain-growth polymerizations, including those in a nonequilibrium state irrespective of the reactor types used. In the context of the present theory, the onset of gelation is simply stated as a point at which the largest eigenvalue of the matrix X reaches unity (i.e., det(I - X) = 0). The present theory provides a unified point of view for various types of gelling systems. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. 36: 2423-2433, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2413-2421 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: positron annihilation ; polyimide ; ion implantation ; membrane ; permeability ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: 6FDA-pMDA polyimide membranes were implanted with 140 keV N+ ions to fluences between 2 × 1014 and 5 × 1015 cm-2. Variable energy positron annihilation spectra were taken and spectral features compared to previously reported changes in gas permeability and permselectivity of these membranes as a function of ion fluence. Positron data corroborate the explanation of these changes in terms of molecular damage caused by the implant: for fluences up to about 1 × 1015 cm-2, the concentration of irradiation-induced defects merely increases with implant fluence; while fluences exceeding this threshold value create a second type of positron annihilation site, thereby marking a distinct change in the structure of the polymer, which is responsible for the vast improvement of gas permselectivity data found at the same threshold fluence. PACS codes: 78.70.Bj - positron annihilation; 61.82.Pv - polymers, organic compounds; 61.72.Ww - doping and impurity implantation. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. 36: 2413-2421, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2435-2447 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: poly(vinylidene fluoride) ; carbon dioxide ; supercritical fluid ; diffusion ; partial molar volume ; solubility parameter ; mass sorption ; high pressure ; dilation ; Sanchez-Lacombe model ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The article reports on the behaviour of poly(vinylidene fluoride) in carbon dioxide at 42°C and 80°C and in a pressure range of 0.1-30 MPa. Experimental techniques for the measurement of gas mass uptake and polymer dilatation are described and the corresponding data are reported as mass sorption and dilatation isotherms, respectively. The mass uptake experiment was also used to follow the evolution of the coefficient of diffusion of carbon dioxide into the polymer as a function of pressure or concentration. An analysis for the calculation of the partial molar volume of carbon dioxide as a function of pressure is also given, which shows that the ‘apparent’ partial molar volume of the carbon dioxide decreases with pressure to very low values, at high pressure. The computed values are significantly less than those for either the liquid or the solid phases of pure carbon dioxide, and also lower than some data previously reported for silicone elastomers. A consideration of the origins of this apparent anomaly is given in the conclusions. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. 36: 2435-2447, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1721-1729 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: phenolic ; miscibility ; hydrogen bonding ; PEO ; PEG ; PVA ; glass transition temperature ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The specific interaction strength of novolak-type phenolic resin blended with three similar polymers [i.e., poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)] were characterized by means of glass transition temperature behavior and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The interassociation formed within phenolic blends with the addition of a modifier not only overcomes the effect of self-association of the phenolic upon blending, but also increases the strength of phenolic blend. The strength of interassociation within the phenolic blend is the function of the hydrogen bonding group of a modifier, in increasing order, is phenolic/PVA, phenolic/PEG, and phenolic/PEO blend, corresponding to the result of “q” value in the Kwei equation. The FTIR result is in agreement with the inference of Tg behavior. In addition, the fact that the specific strength of hydrogen bonding of hydroxyl-hydroxyl is stronger than that of hydroxyl-ether can also be concluded. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1721-1729, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1731-1738 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: poly(p-phenylene sulfide) fiber ; zone-drawing ; zone-annealing ; mechanical properties ; DSC thermogram ; viscoelastic properties ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: A zone-drawing and zone-annealing treatment was applied to poly(p-phenylene sulfide) fibers in order to improve their mechanical properties. The zone-drawing (ZD) was carried out at a drawing temperature of 90°C under an applied tension of 5.5 MPa, and the zone-annealing (ZA) was carried out at an annealing temperature of 220°C under 138.0 MPa. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermogram of the ZD fiber had a broad exothermic transition (Tc = 110°C) attributed to cold-crystallization and a melting endotherm peaking at 286°C. The Tc of the ZD fiber was lower than that (Tc = 128°C) of the undrawn fiber. In the temperature dependence of storage modulus (E′) for the ZD fiber, the E′ values decreased with increasing temperature, but increased slightly in the temperature range of 90-100°C, and decreased again. The slight increase in E′ was attributable to the additional increase in the crosslink density of the network, which was caused by strain-induced crystallization during measurement. The resulting ZA fiber had a draw ratio of 6.0, a degree of crystallinity of 38%, a tensile modulus of 8 GPa, and a tensile strength of 0.7 GPa. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1731-1738, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1739-1746 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: block copolymers ; molecular diffusion ; Forced Rayleigh scattering ; free volume ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Forced Rayleigh scattering was used to investigate the diffusion of a photoreactive dye molecule in two homogeneous poly(styrene-b-isoprene) (SI) diblock copolymers with overall molecular weights of approximately 2000. Although diffusion rates were intermediate to TTI transport in homopolymer polystyrene (PS) and polyisoprene (PI), system dynamics appear to be largely dictated in each case by the PI block. The size of the polymer jumping unit, on the other hand, is evaluated from a free-volume analysis of the data, and is found to be governed predominantly by the PS component of the copolymer. The mechanism for tracer diffusion in low-molecular-weight block copolymers appears analogous to transport in a high molecular weight SI diblock copolymer (Mn = 13,600) that has been solvated sufficiently in toluene to be microstructurally disordered. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1739-1746, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 1757-1767 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: poly(butylene terephthalate) ; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) ; isothermal melt crystallization ; primary crystallization ; secondary crystallization ; recrystallization ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The melting behavior of poly(butylene terephthalate) crystallized isothermally for various times was examined using differential scanning calorimetry. After short crystallization times, the DSC analysis gave two melting peaks, but after longer times, the analysis gave three peaks. The latter triplet of DSC peaks can be denoted as low, middle, and high, starting with the lowest temperature endotherm. The DSC peaks were simulated using a measured recrystallization rate and behavior for PBT and an assumed initial melting point distribution. The low and middle peaks represent the original melting peaks arising from isothermal crystallization. The high melting peak arises from recrystallization during the DSC heating scan. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 1757-1767, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 237-251 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: segmented ; polyurethanes ; crosslinked ; mechanical ; dielectric properties ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Mechanical and dielectric properties of two series of segmented polyurethanes having soft segment concentration of 50 and 70% and a varying degree of crosslinking through the hard segment were studied. The degree of crosslinking in each series was varied by varying the butane diol/trimethylol propane ratio in the chain extender mixture. Tensile strength, elongation at break decrease, but elastic recovery increases monotonically with increasing crosslinking. The plateau modulus in the dynamic mechanical test decreases and then increases with increasing TMP content. Crosslinking causes broadening of the soft segment glass transition as seen by permittivity and loss factor measurements. It also affects high temperature behavior (above the glass transition of the hard segment); it lowers permittivity, loss factor, and ionic conductivity. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 237-251, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 253-263 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: thermotropics ; dynamic viscoelasticity ; relaxation peaks ; gelation ; crystallization ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The rheological characterization of two commercial thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers based on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and para-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB) is carried out. The thermal transitions determined by DMTA are explained by the random character of these copolyesters, in comparison with non-random copolyesters synthesized by Jackson and Kuhfuss. The evolution of the dynamic viscoelastic functions with time in the nematic state is concave in shape for the 20%PET/80%PHB copolymer, a result that leads us to treat this system as a suspension of solid spheres (unmolten crystals) where the volume fraction of crystals increases with time according to an Avrami equation. The response of 40%PET/60%PHB copolymer is similar to a chemical or physical gelation and the hypothesis that the polydomain structure gives rise to a network is considered. Continuous flow, time-independent viscosity results reveal the existence of a three-region flow curve for 40%PET/60%PHB copolymer, but a Newtonian zone followed by a shear thinning region for 20%PET/80%PHB sample. At high temperatures the isotropization of the samples leads to a very strong decrease of the activation energy of flow, which becomes zero for 40%PET/60%PHB. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 253-263, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 281-288 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: side-chain liquid-crystalline polymer membrane ; pervaporation ; benzene/cyclohexane mixture ; state-transformation ; benzene permselectivity ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: When a benzene/cyclohexane mixture of 10 wt % benzene was permeated through side-chain liquid-crystalline polymer (LCP) membranes by pervaporation at various temperatures, the permeation rate increased with increasing permeation temperature. The LCP membranes also exhibited a benzene permselectivity. The permselectivity for the benzene/cyclohexane mixture through the LCP membrane was different in the glassy, liquid-crystalline, and isotropic states. The LCP membrane had different apparent activation energies for permeation at each state. LCP membrane in the liquid-crystalline state had the highest apparent activation energy of the three states. Results suggest that the benzene permselectivity was influenced by changes in the LCP membrane structure, i.e., a state-transformation. It was found that a balance of the orientation of mesogenic groups and the flexibility of the siloxane chains was very important for benzene permselectivity. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 281-288, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 265-280 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: entangled polymer solution ; double-step strain rate ; flow birefringence ; tube model ; segmental stretch ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Experiments measuring the orientation angle and birefringence in startup and double-step strain rate flows were conducted on a 3.0 wt % 8.42 × 106 molecular weight polystyrene solution in a Couette flow cell. A phase-modulated flow birefringence apparatus was used to noninvasively probe the sample. Upon startup from rest, the orientation angle undershoots its final steady-state value, as seen by earlier investigators. When the shear rate undergoes a step increase from one nonzero value to another, the amplitude of this undershoot is decreased. However, a more significant effect is a shorter time scale overshoot in the orientation angle that is highly counterintuitive in the sense that an increase of shear rate initially produces a rotation of chain segments away from the flow direction. Similarly, a step decrease in shear rate yields an initial transient rotation toward the flow direction. In both cases, the height of the peaks depends upon the magnitude of the shear rate jump, and the width of the peaks is a function of the final shear rate. The longer time transients in the startup and step increase experiments reflect an apparent change in the relaxation time for segment orientation, which we tentatively attribute to a combination of tube dilation and convective constraint release. The shorter time scale over- and undershoots in the orientation angle appear to be qualitatively explained by considering the differences in extension or contraction of segments along the polymer chain. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 265-280, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 2103-2109 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers ; multiple-pulse proton NMR ; spin diffusion ; comonomer content ; crystallinity ; long spacing ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Capitalizing on the superior sensitivity of proton NMR, relatively rapid estimates of three parameters, namely, comonomer content, crystallinity, and long spacing, are determined for three ethylene/vinyl alcohol copolymers using solid-state proton NMR measurements. Multiple-pulse techniques are utilized (a) in conjunction with magic angle spinning for measuring comonomer content, (b) in conjunction with a T1xz relaxation measurement for determining crystallinity, and (c) in conjunction with a T1xz-based spin diffusion measurement for determining the long spacing. These three parameters, extracted from data collected in a total spectrometer time of about 20 min, are compared with similar parameters obtained using more conventional DSC, SAXS (including synchrotron), and solution-state NMR measurements. Agreement is found to be good. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. 36: 2103-2109, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 303-318 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: dielectrics ; calorimetry ; linear-chain thermoset ; postcuring ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The dielectric permittivity and loss spectra of an equimolar liquid mixture of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A and cyclohexylamine have been studied during the liquid's isothermal polymerization or curing in separate experiments at different temperatures and thereafter during the postcuring, both on rate-heating and isothermally. The spectra obtained during the growth of the linear chain polymer during the curing and postcuring show the evolution of an intermediate relaxation process whose position in the frequency plane remains relatively insensitive to the decrease in the configurational entropy during the postcuring, but whose strength increases. Postcuring ceases to occur once the calorimetric glass-liquid transition temperature of 345 K, corresponding to the ultimately formed polymeric state, has been reached. The increase in the number of covalent bonds, n, formed during curing and postcuring decreased the equilibrium dielectric permittivity, εs, and increased the characteristic relaxation time, τ0, for all curing and postcuring conditions. For a fixed temperature and n, (dεs/dT) and (dτ0/dT), as well as the values εs and τ0 of the ultimately formed state of the polymers differ significantly when the thermal history of polymerization differs. The slow dynamics in the glass-liquid transition region were analyzed in terms of the enthalpy relaxation and fictive temperature concepts. The distribution of relaxation times for these dynamics correspond to the stretched exponential parameter of 0.6, which is significantly greater than 0.39 determined for the dielectric α-relaxation spectra measured at a temperature 30 K higher. The enthalpy relaxation involves a narrower distribution of intermolecular barriers than dielectric relaxation. The results also show that the recently proposed method for determining the gelation time from the plots of the imaginary component of electrical impedance lacks scientific merit. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci B: Polym Phys 36: 303-318, 1998
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    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 36 (1998), S. 337-344 
    ISSN: 0887-6266
    Keywords: infrared spectroscopy ; multicomponent ; diffusion ; polymer ; Physics ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics